You’ve filled in a briefing, and are patiently waiting to receive some designs. Finally, your designer has followed through, but something just isn’t quite right. Maybe it’s the color, or the size of the text. Whatever the case may be, the design isn’t perfect. Pretty close, but not quite. So, how do you tell your designer their work isn’t where you need it to be in the right way?

Giving feedback is a key part of getting the right design, whether it be a logo, packaging or brand identity design. But maintaining a positive relationship with your designer is, arguably, even more important. The kind of advice that you give greatly influences the entirety of your project. It’s important to set the right tone. So here are some simple tips of what to do, and what not to do when you’re pointing a designer in the right direction.

#1

Getting Off On The Right Foot

Make sure you include everything you require in the design in the briefing, and not afterwards in the advice. Your briefing should be complete enough for designers to present a decent design from the beginning. Don’t make it a guessing game. For more information on how to complete a clear and coherent briefing, click here.

What To Do

Designer: Here’s my design. I included blue and yellow, like you specified in your briefing. Let me know if there’s anything that you would like changed.

Client: Great design! Thank you very much for incorporating the colors I asked for in the briefing. Looks exactly as I imagined it would.

What Not To Do

Designer: Here’s my design. I tried to incorporate the “urban” feeling of your brand you highlighted in the briefing. Let me know if there’s anything that you would like changed.

Client: Looks good. Only thing is that I was actually imagining the logo in a bright red color. Could you change the color?

Designer: Of course, although that wasn’t specified in your briefing…

#2

Don’t Plagiarize Yourself

Make sure the advice you are giving is specific to the design you are looking at. Do not copy and paste advice as it may confuse designers and lead to worse results. The feedback you are giving should be for a certain design, not something general. In the end, copying and pasting feedback could lead to poorer results than the originals.

#3

Pinpoint The Problem

Be specific in your evaluation of the design. Try to pinpoint what specifically you would like fixed and why. What’s the reason you want to change it? Designers are masters at solving problems, but if they don’t know the problem, they are just touching in the dark.

What To Do

Designer: Here’s my design. I hope it’s close to what you’re looking for. Let me know if there’s anything that you would like changed.

Client: Lovely design – although I would appreciate some minor changes. I love how you emphasized the rural vibe of the brand, but I would love if this was more present. It’s so important that the identity of the brand is at the forefront of the design, and the rustic aspect of our brand is key. Some suggestions – maybe include more rural symbols, or find a more traditional font?

What Not To Do

Designer: Here’s my design. I hope it’s close to what you’re looking for. Let me know if there’s anything that you would like changed.

Client: The design is good and I truly appreciate your effort. But something seems off. Maybe mess around with it a little more?

#4

Control Expectations

If you feel a design is too off the mark to be considered as a finalist, try to limit the amount of extra work you give the designer. It’s unfortunate for a designer when they spend hours and hours on a design after receiving extensive feedback from a client only to not be chosen as a finalist. Take this into consideration and try to let designers know whether they should be investing this time or not.

#5

Do It With Respect

Always be kind and respectful. Having a good relationship with designers will lead to much better results. Provide constructive criticism without being rude.

What To Do

Designer: Here’s my design. I hope it’s close to what you’re looking for. Let me know if there’s anything that you would like changed.

Client: I appreciate how you incorporated everything from the briefing into this design. However, it’s not exactly what I had in mind. Is there any chance you could make the text clearer? Maybe sticking to two colors could also help? I think it’s a great start and I can’t wait to see what else you come up with!

What Not To Do

Designer: Here’s my design. I hope it’s close to what you’re looking for. Let me know if there’s anything that you would like changed.

Client: Not even close. Sorry.

Getting the Perfect Design

Getting the perfect design is completely possible, it just requires good communication, the right designer, and some collaboration. Now that you know how to give the right feedback, why not start a project and take the first step towards your new design? DesignBro offers logo design, packaging design and brand identity designs by experienced, hand-picked and high-quality designers. The platform also allows you to speak directly to designers to let them know how you feel about the design they’ve come up with. Designers are, then, allowed to upload updated versions so the design can progress in the right way. So, make an amazing briefing, give them feedback in the right way, and take home the design you’ve been looking for.